Teenage Pregnancy Affects Uganda’s Economy

Teenage Pregnancy Affects Uganda’s Economy

In Uganda 25% of teenagers aged 15-19 have begun child bearing (UBOS, 2016) & with a population growth rate of 3.3% and a population of 41.49 million (World Bank, 2016), approximately 340,000 teenage pregnancies occur each year. 8 of 10 teen mothers come from low social income families and 76% of child bearing teenagers reside in rural areas (UBOS, 2016).

Adolescent pregnancy can also have negative social and economic effects on girls, their families and communities. Unmarried pregnant adolescents may face stigma or rejection by parents and peers and threats of violence. Based on their subsequent lower education attainment, may have fewer skills and opportunities for employment, often perpetuating cycles of poverty: child marriage reduces future earnings of girls by an estimated 9%.

Similarly, girls who become pregnant before age 18 are more likely to experience violence within marriage or a partnership. With regards to education, school-leaving can be a choice when a girl perceives pregnancy to be a better option.

Based on their subsequent lower education attainment, may have fewer skills and opportunities for employment, often perpetuating cycles of poverty: child marriage reduces future earnings of girls by an estimated 9%. Nationally, this can also have an economic cost, with countries losing out on the annual income that young women would have earned over their lifetimes, if they had not had early pregnancies.

School adolescent girls needs access to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) education to help them prevent teenage pregnancy.

 Supporting teen mothers is awarding not only to their lives and families but also to the country economy.

This gives Provident Teen Mothers a reason prioritize adolescent health.

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